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How To Clean Like A Pro...Or Just Get Windows Clean

Posted on January 26th, 2016

How To Clean Like A Pro...Or Just Get Windows Clean


Why window washing isn’t that high on any homeowners’ list to look forward to?

Actually, most homeowners. Most of them hate it. They find it’s an exercise that once it’s done, it’s going to be done again next week. There’s many reasons as to why people dislike washing windows. Maybe it’s the size. Or the number, or that somebody is always sticking it to you.

But think about it. Once you’ve finished, and it’s a particularly sunny day…damn. It becomes a labor that you’re actually quite proud of. You cleaned this windows. They’re spotless, and with the sun coming in, not only can you brag that you’ve saved money on electricity, the entire house seems almost…majestic.

Until you have to do it again. And we have to consider the factors that make cleaning the windows such a chore:

If they’re clear, animals might fly into them. Ouch.

If you’re lucky enough to have a family, somebody’s going to be touching the glass. You’ll accidentally do it yourself, because we all do.

If you have a pet, paw marks and wet noses.

Your friends and neighbors aren’t really dissing you, but they will forget at times.

Rain. Wind. Dust. I could go on, but it would sound depressing. But that’s okay. You just need to learn how to do it like a professional. Or; if you want to just do it, there are ways.

Tools: They say always have the tools for the job. For cleaning windows, many will say you should invest in a squeegee. There’s nothing wrong with that. I have a friend that has only a few windows he cleans, so he is adamant in his favorite go to: the newspaper. I know if he had more windows, or bigger windows, he’d get a squeegee with the T bar handle. He’d also invest in a ladder (if it was taller than his reach), a bucket, lint free clothes, and a woolen scrubber.

Depending how you many you have, this is what you’d want, or need. He has newspapers and a spray bottle, as well as radio, because he says it’s “fun”. It’s not a chore.

He’s the lucky one. But there’s merit in that.

Basics: You always want to start inside, and move the party outside. It’s going to be dirtier outside, of course.

Many of the professionals use a little dish soap in a bucket of cool water, and dip the scrubber into the bucket without making a bunch of bubbles. They scrub the window, moving up and down across the entire window, but use smaller sponges to get corners. Next, they use the squeegee to move evenly across the window, each stroke ending with them wipe the blades with a clean rag. With practice, you could get as good not to get many drips of water. You’ll remove any water left over with a chamois…damp, not wet, and use a towel to dry up any water on the floor.

Repeat process. (My friend? He’s a “Karate Kid” enthusiast, and insists on the wax on/wax off method.)

Tricks for your consideration: Anybody that washes windows has a trick or two. You have to deal with issues such as mineral stains, tree sap, any kind of residue as you’re trying to clean your windows. Like the folks at Anderson Window Co. advising to clean windows on a cloudy, dry day, there are other tips:

•    Pella Corp. spokes Kathy Krafka Harkema advises wetting the glass before using a nonabrasive cleaner on a clean, wet cloth. You can also opt for acetone no a microfiber cloth, but avoid hitting the window frames to avoid discoloration. Rinse twice to remove residue. Frosted, film-covered glass should be cleaned to specification. No scrapers or razor blades, thank you.

•    Brent Weingard; a NYC window washer, says cut down the squeegee to accommodate the hard to clean divided windows.

•    And my nameless compadre still insists by his two rules: a vinegar/water composite, and music while he works.

Whatever the method you decide works for you, just remember that cleaning windows is not a chore, nor a burden. Because In the end; you’ve created a beautiful space like a professional, without half the effort.


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